After re-entering the job market recently, updating my resume was one of the first things I did. I am a numbers guy, so I started thinking about the metrics that would best highlight my accomplishments.

Which KPIs would impress my industry and the top decision-makers in it? What statistics did I use every day on the job?

See, I wasn’t just a pretty face on the speaker’s platform at marketing conferences. I headed up US marketing operations for a UK-based email service provider. I carried metrics like these, and many more, into team and client meetings and executive sessions and used them to build out my marketing plans.

Then, as I compiled my stats, I had an epiphany.

I realized that these big-picture stats aren’t just for your resume. These are the numbers you should be carrying around in your head every day on the job. They’re the stats that help you demonstrate the value and effectiveness of your email program.

If someone — like your CEO — were to stop you in the hall and ask, “How’s our email program really doing?” would you have a ready answer? Or would you stumble over a vague statement about open rates and opt-ins?

Everyday statistics to carry around in your head

These stats serve me well, both on the job and when I’m summing up my career highlights to date:

  • Testing. In my previous job, we did a lot of cool things to inform our account-based management using test data to inform the ads we showed our prospects so that we could better drive them to our web pages to capture their information.
  • KPIs. When I’m on the job, our net sales and opportunity value are constantly in my head. Things like open rates, click rates, conversion rates, number of segments and average order value. What were my goals and what percentage of them did I accomplish?
  • Acquisition. As a B2B marketer, I need to show how many high-quality leads and customers I acquired. For B2C marketers, how many subscribers or customers did you acquire each month? How many converted to purchase in the first 15 or 30 days? What are your lows, highs and averages?
  • Retention. How did I retain those prospects, customers or subscribers? What are my retention rates quarterly or over a year? What’s the average retention or burnout in the same period? When did I know it was time to stop marketing to a prospect?
  • Best and worst campaigns. You know your victories, but talk about your flops, too. Everybody has them. Show what you learned from your failure and how you avoided repeating it. For me, it was a $10,000 campaign with a new ad tech company. It failed miserably, but I stopped the campaign before I spent all the company’s money.
  • Engagement. What drives engagement? I know which subject lines got the most opens and which emails drove the most clicks. Email…