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How To Prepare For The Next Real Estate Downturn

If house B ends up being better (as in, you bought it after the market crashed and paid less), your opportunity cost would be the money you lost that you could have made if you’d waited for house B. When you BRRRR correctly, you can end up buying an investment property with zero money down. When you buy a house traditionally, you put a hefty down payment down, then include money for closing costs and the rehab. In this case, if the market crashes, you don’t have that 50k to invest in the down market, so your opportunity cost is high. This is the reasoning behind the “fear of missing out” that keeps investors from getting started investing in real estate. If you can buy a property and recover the capital you used to buy it, what stops you from buying the next one too? In a hypothetical BRRRR deal, you would buy a fixer upper property for 60k that needs 40k of rehab work. This means you’ll have all that money to put into the next house when the market crashes. If you do this effectively, you can pull out even more money than you put in (by buying great deals and rehabbing prudently), growing your capital and the ability to invest in future properties. How do I know which market to invest in?

25 Best Markets For Rental Property Investment

But rentals aren't a slam-dunk either. Or you could find yourself over-paying in a boom market. First, and most important, the good increase in home prices in the last year means that demand for all housing is strong in these markets, both single-family and rentals. We calculate an "income" price for each market and compare this with the current average home price to see if prices are high or low compared to local income. It's not a precise measure - real estate isn't science - a 10 percent swing one way or the other doesn't mean much, but it shows that from our list only Orlando and Sacramento are close to over-priced territory, near 20 percent, while most of the markets are well below it. The importance of being within the normal range of the "income" price is that you don't have to worry about buying into a boom that can eventually bust. The chance that the average home price in a normal market will ever fall below today's price is almost zero. I've thrown in some stats about recent population growth and the current average home price because some markets have grown faster than others, and some are more expensive to invest in. In these markets you have a better chance investing in apartments, or by splitting single-family houses into several rental units. It's a good time to invest in rentals.

Should you use home equity to delay Social Security?

For some time, reverse mortgage lenders touted a strategy that involves obtaining a HECM early on in retirement in order to delay taking Social Security, therefore maximizing the benefits you can receive. For every year that you can delay taking Social Security from 62 to 70, you can get as much as 8% more. According the CFPB report, the expense of taking a reverse mortgage means that by age 69, the cost of the loan exceeds the cumulative lifetime benefits of a reverse by $2,300. “For consumers whose main asset is their home, taking out a reverse mortgage to delay Social Security claiming may risk their financial security because the cost of the loan will likely be more than the benefit they gain. “The CFPB’s analysis, misrepresentations, and inaccurate conclusions fail to provide a comprehensive review of potential benefits of Social Security deferral and proper use of home equity,” Hopkins wrote. “Using a HECM to fund Social Security delay does not create greater risk for retirees experiencing spending shocks or needing to move later in retirement, because reduced distribution needs from the investment portfolio and the subsequent reduction in sequence risk offset the reverse-mortgage costs and preserve overall net worth,” Pfau wrote. “We found that while financial advisors are interested in the idea, they have a very, very, very difficult time persuading their clients to defer their benefit,” Dickson said. I can tell you that there are situations where the reverse mortgage loan would make sense. There are many factors that need to be considered,” Holland said. Ultimately, Holland said issuing broad statements about financial planning strategies is problematic, because it all depends on individual circumstances.

How Much Does a 2-Bedroom Apartment Cost in Your State?

Only in 22 counties in the United States is a one-bedroom home affordable to someone working 40 hours per week at federal minimum wage. That’s from the National Low Income Housing Coalition (NLIHC) report, which outlines the mismatch between wages and rent every year. (Fair Market Rent is an annually updated government estimate, typically the 40th percentile of the gross rent in an area.) NLIHC estimates that the average renter’s hourly wage in the United States is $16.88. The average renter in each county makes enough to afford a two-bedroom in only 11 percent of U.S. counties, and a one-bedroom, in only 43 percent. The national “housing wage” in 2018 is $22.10 for a modest two-bedroom rental home and $17.90 for a one-bedroom, the report estimates. (That’s how much an average renter in the U.S. would need to make to afford a modest apartment at fair market rent, without paying more than 30 percent of their income towards housing. Still, in not a single state, city, or county can someone earning federal or state minimum wage for a 40-hour work week afford to rent a two-bedroom home at fair market rent. The incredible shortfall in affordable units remains the more stubborn, intractable problem. Between 2005 and 2015, apartments costing $2,000 and more increased by 97 percent, according to Harvard University’s Joint Center for Housing Studies; Meanwhile, those under $800 decreased by 2 percent.

Institutional Investors Plan to Up Their Allocations to Real Estate in 2019

Institutional investors plan to dedicate more of their funds to real estate next year, continuing a trend that has been seen since 2013, according to a new research report. Global institutional investors’ average weighted target allocation to real estate is expected to tick up in 2019 to 10.6 percent from 10.4 percent in 2018, according to results of a survey administered by Cornell University’s Baker Program in Real Estate and Hodes Weill & Associates, a real estate advisory firm. “We’re still in a very low interest-rate environment and investors are still hungry for yield,” says Jim Costello, senior vice president at real estate data firm Real Capital Analytics. Real estate is also seeing strong returns for institutional investors, Weill says. In 2017, the average total return for these real estate portfolios was 9.2 percent, up from 8.7 percent in 2016. The target for 2018 is 8.2 percent, the Cornell/Hodes Weill report found. The report found that investors based in the Americas on average expect target real estate allocations in 2019 to be at 9.9 percent—flat with this year’s target. Weill says this is something he expects will continue: “If you look at conviction, the institutions in the U.S. have the least favorable view of real estate, and I think it’s driven by a general view that real estate is late in the cycle,” Weill says. But institutions based in the Americas were closest in 2018 to their targets; their actual allocation of 9.0 percent to real estate was 90 basis points shy of their target. In the Americas, 95 percent of institutions indicated they are actively targeting value-add investments compared to 50 percent that target core strategies.

The 22 American cities with the most million-dollar homes

LendingTree collected real estate data from more than 155 million properties across the United States to calculate which cities have the highest concentration of homes worth $1 million and up. Four cities in California have more than 10% of homes valued over $1 million. LendingTree then calculated the concentration of million-dollar homes in each city by dividing the number of homes valued at $1 million or higher by the total number of homes in the statistical area, according to the report. The data shows that expensive properties are more likely to be on the coasts than inland America with the exception of Denver, Colorado. Four cities in California have more than 10% of homes valued over $1 million, and San Jose is the only place where the median home value (among all homes) is above $1 million. Charlotte, North Carolina SergeevDen/Shutterstock Percent of million-dollar homes: 1.02% Median value of homes: $187,000 Median value of million-dollar homes: $1,295,000 2/22 21. Baltimore, Maryland Jon Bilous/Shutterstock Percent of million-dollar homes: 1.07% Median value of homes: $270,000 Median value of million-dollar homes: $1,214,000 3/22 20. Riverside, California sirtravelalot/Shutterstock Percent of million-dollar homes: 1.12% Median value of homes: $332,000 Median value of million-dollar homes: $1,339,000 4/22 19. San Diego, California Vacclav/Shutterstock Percent of million-dollar homes: 10.55% Median value of homes: $563,000 Median value of million-dollar homes: $1,384,000 19/22 4. San Francisco, California Andrew Zarivny/Shutterstock Percent of million-dollar homes: 40.03% Median value of homes: $891,000 Median value of million-dollar homes: $1,409,000 22/22 1.

Why More Real Estate Companies Are Becoming Venture Investors In Tech Startups

Legacy commercial real estate firms that spent decades focusing their investment on physical properties have begun launching venture funds to invest in technology companies, aiming to solve problems in their portfolio and bring in big returns. Most of those companies focus on commercial office and retail properties and invest in tech companies that solve problems in those sectors, but one of the nation's largest affordable housing developers is now getting into the space. Enterprise Community Partners Vice President of Innovation Matt Hoffman tells Bisnow the nonprofit plans to launch a fund next year to invest in early stage technology companies addressing housing affordability. “We would like to see the housing sector get exposed to a disruptive technology platform much like Uber was to the taxi industry or Airbnb to the hotel industry.” New York-based Rudin Management Co., a 93-year-old real estate firm with roughly 15M SF of office and residential properties under management, in 2015 launched a venture fund to invest in real estate-related technology companies. Gilbert, who also serves as chief technology officer, said the first thing Rudin looks for in a potential investment is the problem it solves. The majority of the well-funded PropTech companies focus on the commercial office sector rather than residential, Hoffman said, and the investment in multifamily-focused technologies isn't addressing the issue that Enterprise sees as its primary mission: housing affordability. The financial returns startup tech companies have the potential to generate can be as attractive to commercial real estate companies as the underlying problems they solve. Strategic Property Partners is doing that with its $3B Water Street Tampa project, a 50-acre development planned to include 9M SF of commercial, residential, hospitality, retail and other space. SPP Senior Vice President of Digital Innovation and Technology Steven Fifita said the developer is planning to utilize a variety of technologies at the development. "I think it is an evolution we're seeing in many industries, especially in commercial real estate, where it's an industry that's comfortable with investment to begin with and the notion of risk," Fifita said.

8 Ways to Make Money With Mobile Homes Inside Mobile Home Parks

Pro Tip: Check with local park managers to find out which parks allow renting, many will not. Pro Tip: As an active mobile home investor, you will want to pay much lower than the retail price for any investment home you purchase. Wholesaling Similar to single-family homes, wholesaling a mobile home inside a mobile home park will allow you to create value between a buyer and seller without actually purchasing the mobile home. As an active mobile home investor, you will obtain a purchase contract on the mobile home and quickly aim to sell this contract to another investor or end-user buyer for a profit. The act of bird dogging mobile homes inside parks is the process of finding and reporting all FSBO properties that fit an investor’s criteria to the active mobile home investors you already know. Some mobile home communities will offer “incentive programs” for park-approved home owners that are willing/able to move in a park-approved mobile home. Pro Tip: When speaking to any new community manager, aim to understand any/all move-in incentive programs for future mobile homes and the age/condition/size of mobile homes the park would consider allowing you to move into the community. Selling Directly to the Park When dealing with a more expensive mobile home or double-wide mobile home (one that must be moved after purchasing), it may be attractive to simply re-sell the mobile home to a local mobile home park that you know is looking for more units. When selling directly to a mobile home park, you'll want to understand what each park is looking for in a used mobile home and how much these parks are willing to pay. Moving Unwanted Mobile Homes from One Park to Another If a park owner wants a mobile home removed from the community, perhaps you can help.

How to climb the investment ladder in real estate

"People think that to start investing in real estate, you need a lot of money, but you really don't," he said. "Once you can find the deal and understand the formula for making a profit," he said, "you bring a deal to someone like me now, and if it makes sense, I will partner with you." As a young real estate agent he worked with investors, finding them properties to flip. "They were making $50,000 or more in profit," he said, "and I would make my little $5,000 commission." "I took Lucky to the auction and showed him what people were buying and what they were making," said Fuentes. Plus, now there were too many investors. Using these kind of high-interest lenders, Fuentes is able to put less down and put more money toward buying properties and renovations. Now Fuentes funds and runs his own real estate investments, flipping about 15 homes a year, in addition to being a real estate agent and owner of three RE/MAX offices. "Perhaps your first deal is a 30% cut for you, maybe less," he said, "but you'll learn from the process and you'll make some money. If you have a 20% or 10% drop you're not making any money."

TEDxEvansville is back, here are this year’s speakers, topics

— Tickets remain available for TEDxEvansville, scheduled for 1-5 p.m. Friday at the University of Southern Indiana Performance Center. Eight speakers are featured at this year's event, which has a one-word theme: "Connect." This year's event is the fourth in Evansville. She is also the mother of an only son who passed in 2017 from complications due to a substance use disorder. Hall is a student at Butler University studying history, political science and Spanish who is from Evansville. His undergraduate research has focused on the importance of public memory and how communities like his hometown remember and commemorate historical events and actors. Caballero holds a Master of healthcare administration from the University of Southern Indiana and is an account executive for Medical Services of America. Caballero has served the needs of the poor through international medical missions, developing multidisciplinary strategic population health plans in the Evansville community and improving Alzheimer’s Dementia care in Southwest Indiana. An Evansville native, Johnson is the founder and executive director of a nonprofit organization called Young & Established, created in 2013. Prior to moving to Evansville, Philip worked for the City of Indianapolis where he managed community and economic development projects in coordination with the city’s Quality of Life Planning initiatives.

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8 ‘Valuable’ Home Features That May Be a Big Waste of...

No one likes to overpay for a purchase, and this is particularly true when buying a home. And if you have kids or plan to spend a lot of time outdoors, it's a fine feature to splurge on. "Homes closer to major commerce centers cost quite a bit more than homes in outlying or suburban areas," says real estate agent Jamie Klingman at Boutiquerealtyflorida.com. Look for homes just outside the district to save on purchase price and property taxes. A single-story house when you're fine with stairs In many locations, homes all on the same level command a higher dollar value because the boomer generation prefers them when downsizing, says Jen Nelson, an agent in Phoenix. Since a purchase price directly reflects things like size, why overpay for bedrooms or media rooms you won't use—and have to heat, cool, furnish, and clean? But such premium upgrades and add-ons will send a purchase price north, so you'd better make sure you use whatever you buy, often. Make no mistake, those fees are for amenities—think a gym or lounge—so if you don't plan to take advantage of these features, you're squandering your money. "But you never want to buy the most expensive home in the neighborhood," says Vosburgh. While it might be fun to know your casa is the area’s castle, having the top comp in a neighborhood may become an issue when it comes time to sell.