stop-flipping

Fixing and flipping houses looks cool on “reality” TV, but in actuality, many are finding that it isn’t nearly as profitable as what it is perceived to be.

House flipping TV shows have caused an epidemic. There are thousands of aspiring new investors out there, including my Uber driver, who are rushing to try their hand at it, after equipping themselves with a few episodes of a television series. Both the data and my personal experience seem to show that it isn’t nearly as profitable as many believe. In fact, it can be a highly risky venture.

Investors Are Losing Money on House Flips

One of the first things experienced investors will notice about these TV shows is that the rough numbers shown at the end don’t always appear to factor in a lot of the costs. That means even in these silver screen scenarios, the actors are typically pocketing a lot less than they are made out to be.

New data from ATTOM, the leading provider of real estate and property data, shows that many are losing money, too. The latest Home Flipping Report reveals that average house flip profits are declining. The number of flippers using cash has also dropped to an eight-year low. RealtyTrac says that 21% of transactions show a gross profit of less than 10%. That means once all numbers are added up, these deals likely lost money. That’s in addition to 8% of flips that sold for less than the property was purchased for.

None of these numbers track the much larger pool of new investors who have bought properties, have gotten stuck on rehabs, or have over-improved—and are still sitting on these liabilities costing them money every month.

The Tax…